Toga Party at the University Museum



Date: Sunday, August 25
Time: 9-11:00 pm
Location: Penn Museum, 3260 South Street

(Enter through Warden Garden by 33rd and South Street, right across from Franklin Field)


Penn’s world-famous archaeology and anthropology museum, with its magnificent Chinese Rotunda, Egyptian mummies, and rare artifacts in the Etruscan, Greek, and Roman collections, invites you to this unique Penn tradition.
 
In the spirit of the night, all are invited to dress in the garb of the ancient world, and togas abound – some beautiful, some outrageous, and all radically creative.  Prizes will be awarded for the best costumes by a panel of seasoned judges.  Our DJ and performances by student groups (including Mask and Wig, Dhamaka, and Yalla) keeps things hot for those who like to dance, and the scavenger hunt lures you into gallery after gallery.

Check out some of the exhibits that will be at the museum during the party!

Black Bodies in Propaganda: The Art of the War Poster
Through March 2, 2014

Propaganda is used to mobilize people in times of war. Black Bodies in Propaganda: The Art of the War Poster presents 33 posters, most targeting Africans and African-American civilians in times of war. These carefully designed works of art were aimed at mobilizing people of color in war efforts, even as they faced oppression and injustice in their homelands. Witness changing messages on race and politics through propaganda from the American Civil War to the African Independence movement in this innovative, world-premiere exhibition.
 
Tukufu Zuberi, the Lasry Family Professor of Race Relations, and Professor of Sociology and Africana Studies at the University of Pennsylvania, curates the exhibition, providing his perspective on more than 200 years of African and African American military history, told through his private collection of propaganda posters.

In the Artifact Lab: Conserving Egyptian Mummies
Through 2014

Part exhibition, and part working laboratory, a glass-enclosed conservation lab brings you right into a museum conservator’s world. See the tools of the trade and watch as conservators work on a wide array of Egyptian objects including rare paintings, ancient funerary objects, and, of course, mummies! Enjoy this unique opportunity to follow conservators as they protect, restore, and preserve pieces of ancient Egyptian history in this 2,000 square foot exhibition.

Visitors can look in to see a range of artifacts in various stages of conservation, watching as members of the Penn Museum Conservation Department move from studying, preparing, cleaning, mending, or conserving an elegant ancient coffin lid, to working on elaborately wrapped animal mummies and human mummy heads.

Year of Sound: Hollywood in the Amazon
August 18, 2013 through July 27, 2014
 
In 1931, an expedition from the Penn Museum traveled by sea, air, and river to the remote Amazonian jungles of Brazil inhabited by the Bororo people. Academy Awarding-winning cinematographer Floyd Crosby, working with Penn Museum anthropologist Vincenzo Petrullo and others, recorded an expeditionary film Matto Grosso, the Great Brazilian Wilderness, which included the first time non-Western people were seen and heard on the emerging technology of sound-synced film. The groundbreaking film, several artifacts from the Bororo people collected during the expedition, as well as new translations of Bororo speakers heard in the film, are part of this special exhibition, developed as part of the University of Pennsylvania’s 2013–2014 Year of Sound.

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To learn more about these treasures on Penn’s campus, the Museum’s rich history, and its special exhibitions, visit www.penn.museum.

Toga Contest!

Dress your best for a chance to win a $50 Bookstore Gift Card! The NSO Staff will be observing your togas throughout the evening and the best costumes will participate in a walk-off at the DJ booth at 10:30pm. One prize will be awarded in each of the following categories: Best Female, Best Male, Most Original, and Craziest! So make sure to go all out!

 

How to Make Your Own Toga